A history of web projects

The official title of my OSU Graduate Assistantship is “Student Affairs Web Specialist.” Here are a few of the projects that I have worked on since I arrived in Corvallis in 2004.

OSU Admissions old
When I first started my assistantship at OSU, the Admissions web site looked like this:

old admissions design

The site was in need of an overhaul. The first few months of my assistantship were spent fighting fires. Various issues would arise that would need taking care of, and a complete overhaul of the Admissions web site would not happen for a long time.

OSU International Admissions
The primary project that I was assigned to was managing the re-design of the International Admissions web site (the version that is currently up is a progression from last year’s design.).

old international design

The International Admissions web site was re-designed using web standards and user feedback. The site was easy to navigate and loaded quickly due to its css-based layout.

admissions international design

The re-designed International Admissions web site received positive reviews from the OSU community and from several external audiences.

Eric Stoller’s Blog
Initially, the ESB was used to house my technology workshop lessons/links. The focus shifted when I decided that the blog could serve as my portfolio for CSSA as well as a personal journal. I blogged about life, school, and work. Eventually, my social justice posts became the primary focus of the blog. I think this is probably due to the fact that my passion for social justice came to the forefront of my life while I was in the midst of a life changing experience. I built the blog using WordPress. The theme was a free theme that I shaped to my own devices. I’ve added plugins for subscribers and recent comments/posts. The flexibility of a css-based design has allowed me to change colors, font sizes, etc. The php include construction of WordPress enabled me to add search functionality and comment functionality to posts/pages where it did not normally appear by default.

Eric Stoller's blog screenshot

I have had quite the experience with the blog. It is personal. It is professional. It is a portfolio.

OSU Precollege
I was given this project as a quick and easy web re-design. The folks over at OSU Precollege needed a web presence that reflected a consistent look and feel of the overall OSU web. I utilized a template from OSU Publications and created a basic web site.

OSU Precollege web page design

The biggest challenge with this project was the lack of “client” communication. The site was created by yours truly in a design vacuum. It’s not usually the way I would like to work. I prefer a collaborative process in which stakeholder involvement drives the project. The previous Precollege site had not been updated for a long time, and I fear that the current site design will exist for far to long. Unfortunately, I think this reflects the belief that as long as a site is online it is functioning. I believe this creates a static, cob web ridden presence that does not involve the actual users of the site.

OSU Success
This site was designed by an external vendor but I had a large role in the accessibility and usability of the site. The site was initially constructed in a format that was deemed to be boring for its intended audience. First-year students need a site that encourages participation as well as incentives for return visits.

OSU Success

I learned a lot about working with an external vendor on this project. There was a lot of planning, communicating, designing, and thinking that went into this project. The final project was accessible as well as standards compliant. The student response was very favorable and the site differed from similar sites.

A blog was created to compliment the student OSU Success site. Students were selected from the orientation staff and trained in the art of blogging. Site statistics showed that we did not have the best results with regards to visitors. However, I believe that the blog was a great experience for the student writers as well as for the students who read it.

OSU Success Blog


OSU Success for Parents and Family

A companion site for Parents and Family was created to compliment the student version. Parents and family were given content which was relevant to their experience. The site design that was used was simple and easy to use. Once again, the site was accessible and highly usable.

OSU Success for Parents and Family

Basecamp
While working with the OSU Success vendor, I became aware that the amount of email correspondence was becoming unmanageable. I had recently discovered the 37 Signals project management application: Basecamp. OSU staff and the external vendor utilized Basecamp for file transfer, deadline creation, and intergroup communications. The tool became an online archive for everyone on the project. Basecamp became a key component to our overall communications and project management strategy.

Basecamp and OSU

I’m really glad that I suggested Basecamp. For me, this clearly represented how online applications can be used to streamline group processes and communications.

OSU Graduate School
OSU Publications designed a new web site for the OSU Graduate School. I stepped in and was able to manage the interface between the folks from Publications and the Graduate School. I taught the GS folks how to update the new site as well as how to navigate a site that was structured using css and includes.

OSU Grad School web site screenshot
OSU Grad School forms screenshot

The Graduate School now uses online forms for a variety of data transmission functions. This should save them a lot of time, money and effort. The new GS site and online forms provides a heightened user experience for student users due to increased accessibility, usability, and functionality.

OSU Admissions new
The OSU Admissions web site re-design project was a terrific experience. It was a collaborative experience in which OSU Publications and OSU Admissions joined forces to create a standards compliant, user-friendly site. The site utilizes css and includes. We focused a lot on separation of content from the design. The new site includes a blog that has received a lot of visits. Written by an Admissions staffer, the blog showcases OSU Admissions as well as the accomplishments of the OSU community. I created the blog using WordPress (my personal blogging experience enabled me to set up the blog). The Admissions template encloses the new blog so that the user experience is seamless. The new Admissions site continues to grow and search engine optimization will increase as the site expands.

OSU NEW Admissions design screenshot

Admissions site level 2 redesign screenshot

OSU Admissions website level 3 screenshot

OSU Admissions blog


OSU Document Management Project

The OSU DMP is using a blog (another WordPress blog that I created) to transmit information to key stakeholders as well as enable users to interact with the site. The project is enormous in scope and will utilize the blog to maintain a constant stream of communication with users.

OSU EM DMP Blog screenshot


OSU Student Affairs

I am in charge of re-designing the OSU Student Affairs web site. The current version (pictured below) is not standards compliant and it is due for an overhaul. The primary users of this site are internal users. The site will serve as a central hub of information. I plan on using code from the OSU Admissions site design. The Admissions code is accessible and the site structure efficiently separates content from design.

OSU Student Affairs web site original screenshot


OSU Student Affairs – redesigned

Oregon State University Student Affairs website

*One of my last projects will probably involve the creation of a wiki for OSU Enrollment Management IT. The wiki will serve as a repository of techie tips and experiential histories. I’ve never created a wiki before so I will need to research the wiki options that exist. OSU CWS currently uses a wiki and I will probably see if their site wiki would work for OSU EM IT.

Multicultural Action Plan (Journey)

A paper for my Multicultural Competency in Student Affairs class:

First of all, I want to clarify that I cannot stand the term, “plan.” It seems soulless when the context is multicultural action or social justice. A plan is something that does not reach my heart. For the purpose of this paper, I am going to use “journey” as the descriptor for what this document is all about. I think I’ve been on a multicultural competency journey since I started my graduate program. In the span of 2 years I have gained significant social justice “muscles.” I’ve written about white privilege, sexism, heterosexism, homophobia, and ableism. I attended a multicultural institute. I have decided that I am going to be an anti-racist, feminist, ally. When I started my graduate program I talked about the importance of diversity but I was not aware of my white privilege. I was not aware that I was actively contributing to sexism. I did not realize that oppressions are interconnected. I was an ally for LGBT folks but I did not realize how much racism and sexism seeped from my psyche.

My journey into social justice is still in its infancy. It is my desire to use this paper as a letter to myself. It will serve as a reminder to me that I still have a lot of learning and self-awareness work to do. Hopefully I will read this paper 5 to 10 years from now and see progress. This paper will serve as my social justice time capsule. One of my professors said that living with purpose makes someone matter. Multicultural action and social justice are two things that matter in my life. I wrote a paper about how oppression harms the oppressor and I really feel that this place that I am now in allows me to work towards subverting the dominant paradigm and the system of institutionalized oppression that we all live in.

What multicultural issues do I want to learn more about?
Suzanne Pharr’s excellent work on the common elements of oppressions has helped me to understand the linkages of various oppressions. The oppression of one marginalized group via the marginalization of another group will not end oppression. I’ve heard this labeled as “the Oppression Olympics.” I really feel that this interconnectedness of oppressions is something that I need to research further. I also need to dialogue with others about how to articulate the fact that I truly believe that oppressions are all related. I have read a lot, but I need to experience more in my daily life. Thankfully, I have a great group of social justice educator friends who humor my thirst for conversation.

In addition to conversations, I am planning on reading more books by people of color, by folks who are transgender, by folks with disabilities, and by folks who write from the perspective of multiple oppressions. For example: radical women of color.

My knowledge of history needs to be re-made. I was taught that Columbus discovered America. How do Native Americans exist in that kind of educational system? I hope to use my white privilege to work towards re-educating my white sisters and brothers. I know very little. I have taken a few classes, read a few books, and had a few conversations, but I still have a lot of work to do. Another “issue” that I need to address is my own heritage. What do I know about Germany, Ireland, or the Cherokee Nation? Almost nothing. The truth of the matter is that I am white and my culture is unknown to me. I have to learn about my own history.

My social life

When I was growing up, all of my friends were white. I did not have any friends of color. None of the members of my family had friends of color that I knew of. Everyone that I associated with on a social level for the first two-thirds of my life were white, heterosexual, and low to middle class. Presently, I have friends of color, friends who are gay, and my partner is a woman of color. Does this mean anything? I think it means that I have come a long way in my understanding of what it means to appreciate and celebrate differences. My current friends are as diverse as my thinking. I have learned a lot from them. They have been so patient with me. Sometimes I feel like all I do is ask questions. Most of the time though, I feel like my social life is wonderful. I support my friends and they support me.

Conferences
As I continue my multicultural journey I have come to realize that I need to speak up sometimes. One venue where I feel that I need to voice my opinion in is the professional conference. When I hear a white person say something about “normal students” and then refer to students of color as “non-traditional,” I need to speak up. I think I will plan on presenting at the next NASPA conference. I think it would be appropriate if I presented a session on ally work from a student affairs context. Perhaps a half-day session so that material could be delved into. It has been too often the case, in my experience, that social justice sessions barely scratch a surface and rarely involve depth.

How will I approach institutionalized discrimination?

I think I will work hard to educate those who are in my sphere of influence that the institution is oppressive and works towards an educational subversion. White privilege is a powerful tool when it is used as a crowbar against oppression.

Blogs and Action
I have found that blogs, both reading them as well as posting on one, have proven to be a great way to connect with a diverse group of people. It takes a lot of energy to post on my blog as well as to take the time to read what other people are writing, but I think I have built virtual relationships that are fairly strong. They have been forged by our collective stance against oppression. Who knows if our blogs will always exist, but at the very least, they have given us ways to connect and to share with one another.

Conclusion
I realize that this journey letter, this plan, this smattering of thoughts is but a small part of my everyday existence. Multicultural competency is something that is an ongoing process in my life. I feel that I have so much to learn and to discover about myself but also about people all over the world. It’s frightening that someone can make it this far in life and still have no idea about who they are. The reality is that I am a long ways away from being a multiculturally competent student affairs practitioner. Most of the theories that I have been taught come from a supposedly generalizable, white-male specific foundation. I need to read about theories from people of color about people of color. I need to read about theories from LGBT folks about LGBT folks. My head is spinning with what I need to learn. (Eric — when you read this next, you need to have read some more, talked some more, etc.)

The Common Elements of Oppressions


The Common Elements of Oppressions
by Suzanne Pharr

It is virtually impossible to view one oppression, such as sexism or homophobia, in isolation because they are all connected: sexism, racism, homophobia, classism, ableism, anti-Semitism, ageism. They are linked by a common origin-economic power and control-and by common methods of limiting, controlling and destroying lives. There is no hierarchy of oppressions. Each is terrible and destructive. To eliminate one oppression successfully, a movement has to include work to eliminate them all or else success will always be limited and incomplete.

To understand the connection among the oppressions, we must examine their common elements. The first is a defined norm, a standard of rightness and often righteousness wherein all others are judged in relation to it. This norm must be backed up with institutional power, economic power, and both institutional and individual violence. It is the combination of these three elements that makes complete power and control possible. In the United States, that norm is male, white, heterosexual, Christian, temporarily able-bodied, youthful, and has access to wealth and resources. It is important to remember that an established norm does not necessarily represent a majority in terms of numbers; it represents those who have ability to exert power and control over others.

Continue reading The Common Elements of Oppressions

Google censors Chinese internet users

I am not happy with the fact that Google is censoring Chinese web users. Google’s motivation for this censorship is blatantly obvious. By complying with China’s government, Google is saying that they are still a capitalist endeavor. Google’s Senior Counsel said it in less obvious terms, “In deciding how best to approach the Chinese–or any–market, we must balance our commitments to satisfy the interest of users, expand access to information, and respond to local conditions.” Aren’t Chinese users interested in all forms of information? Even if it is listed as subversive? How exactly are they expanding access by censoring a person’s ability to find information? The last bit about local conditions is the key phrase to Google’s money driven philosophy. This saddens me greatly.

W3C Accessibility Guidelines

If you create, design, or manage a website, this is very important. The ableism that occurs in the brick and mortar world is found in the virtual environment within flash ridden swf files and inaccessible web pages. Please join me in creating an accessible online environment.

W3C Web Content Accessibility Guidelines

[Priority 1]
A Web content developer must satisfy this checkpoint. Otherwise, one or more groups will find it impossible to access information in the document. Satisfying this checkpoint is a basic requirement for some groups to be able to use Web documents.

[Priority 2]
A Web content developer should satisfy this checkpoint. Otherwise, one or more groups will find it difficult to access information in the document. Satisfying this checkpoint will remove significant barriers to accessing Web documents.

[Priority 3]
A Web content developer may address this checkpoint. Otherwise, one or more groups will find it somewhat difficult to access information in the document. Satisfying this checkpoint will improve access to Web documents. “

AACRAO Presentation

Jim and I went up to Portland in July to present at the AACRAO Admissions Institute. We presented on Technology and Admissions. The presentation went really well. Jim and I had never presented before so it was nice to see that our styles meshed well. He is very serious while I like to inject a bit of levity. The audience seemed to enjoy our presentation. The evaluations were very positive.

I was in charge of editing the powerpoint that we used for the presentation. It was originally created in 2004 and the technology section needed several updates on accessibility, usability, and web statistics. The powerpoint section that I edited was used by presenters in Georgia, Massachusetts, and Texas.

AACRAO Admissions Institute 2005 Presentation

Team Liberation

I participated in a 4 day Team Liberation training this month. It was a terrific experience. I learned about how to facilitate human relations workshops.

Padma and I co-facilitated a workshop called the “Coming Out Star.” This workshop illustrates the harmful effects of homophobia. People create paper stars which represent their hopes, dreams, family members, things they love, etc. Due to the destructive effects of homophobia, people end up folding their stars (to illustrate negative emotions) and sometimes they have to rip off star points which have the name of a loved one on them. Some participants tore off all of their points and throw their star onto the floor. They have just committed suicide. This part of the exercise was extremely emotional for me. I have been part of a heterosexist, homophobic culture and I have come to terms with my guilt, but it still made me very sad to watch people who I care about get so upset when they destroyed their stars. This workshop is almost as hard to facilitate as it is to participate in.


What is Team Liberation?

Team Liberation is a group of facilitators (mostly students) of human relations workshops. These workshops include issues of racism, sexism, heterosexism, classism, ageism, ableism, religious intolerance, communication and community & leadership development in an interactive and inclusive way. Team Liberation facilitators have received over forty hours of intensive training, followed by additional peer mentoring in facilitation with diverse groups on campus and in the community.

Why “Liberation”?

Liberation is “a movement seeking equal rights and status for a group”. It is also a state of being. We as facilitators are seeking to help people liberate themselves from the thought-patterns and actions of social systems of oppression in which they have been immersed. We seek to manifest the change that we seek in the world—that everyone, regardless of race, gender, sexual orientation, class, religion, age, or ability, has an equal opportunity to grow, thrive and live with dignity and respect.

What We Do

Team Liberation facilitates experiential exercises and process learning methods to provide the following:

  • Communication and Relationship Building
    An initial goal of human relations facilitations is to create a safe and supportive environment conducive to open and honest dialogue.
  • Raising Awareness
    With the proper atmosphere created, a facilitation or workshop can encourage participants to expand their awareness of the impact of different social circumstances on individuals and groups.
  • Education and Training
    Workshops can also challenge participants’ assumptions about individuals and groups. It also provides opportunities to develop new strategies for care in daily interactions.
  • Consensus/Buy-In and Community Development
    Finally, group facilitation works to aid group members in recognizing and actively valuing each others’ contributions to the shared environment. This layer can include development of group goals and action plans.

Each workshop is custom designed for the participant group to match the group’s needs and goals, based upon interviews with the group organizer and using the knowledge and experience of the facilitators involved.

Accessibility/Usability Validators — Readings

MIT’s Usability Guidelines

Accessibility / Usability Information from Anitra Pavka

Cynthia Says – web page accessibility checker

Accessify – Online Accessibility Resources

Web XACT – 508 / WAI 1,2,3 Analysis Tool

A great interview with Joe Clark, web accessibility master/guru/expert/etc.

W3C HTML Validator

W3C Link Checker (it will tell you if you have any “bad” links)

Color blind simulator

Frequent web page accessibility issues:

  • Frames — oftentimes, developers use frames as a convenient means to separate data sets. Frames are usually a virtual roadblock for users with visual impairments due to incompatibility with screen reader technology.
  • Alt tags — Alt tags are used to describe images. If an image is used to provide a user with content then the tag needs to correctly identify the image. If an image is used as a design element then the tag needs to be coded as alt=””. This will allow screen readers to pass over an image without wasting a user’s time.
  • CSS/XHTML –Structured markup will ensure that when images and formatting are removed, the content of a site will still be accessible for all users.
    Skip navigation links — If navigational menus are duplicated on all pages of a website than a developer should always provide the user with a means to skip the duplicated menu. This will create a heightened usability factor for your user.
  • New windows — When a web site opens a new window, a user’s navigation ability can be severely decreased. The back button becomes useless and the ability to navigate to the previous page becomes impossible.

A List Apart: Source for web standards information
http://www.alistapart.com/topics/accessibility/

Assistive Technology Act of 1998
http://section508.gov/docs/AT1998.html

Information Technology Technical Assistance and Training Center (ITTATC):
National Assessment of State E&IT Accessibility Initiatives
http://www.ittatc.org/laws/state_intro.cfm

International Center for Disability Resources on the Internet
http://www.icdri.org/

Making Web Sites Work for People With Disabilities
http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v47/i21/21a03001.htm

National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)
http://www.ed.gov/rschstat/research/pubs/programs.html

Opera: a web browser with several accessibility features
http://opera.com/features/access/

Oregon State University online accessibility documentation
http://www.oregonstate.edu/accessibility

Section 508 Information
http://www.section508.gov

Spazowham Design — “we build sites from raw, organic table-free XHTML and CSS, 100% validated, compliant to W3C standards and Section 508, and ready to run in any browser on any device.”
http://www.spazowham.com/

WebAIM: Accessibility in Mind — Free online accessibility tools
http://www.webaim.org/techniques/articles/freetools/

WebAIM: Accessibility in Mind — Section 508 Web Accessibility Checklist
http://www.webaim.org/standards/508/508checklist.pdf

Web-Based Information and Prospective Students with Disabilities:
A Study of Liberal Arts Colleges
http://www.educause.edu/apps/eq/eqm04/eqm0446.asp

Enrollment Management tech

Final paper for my Disability Issues class:

Functional Area

Enrollment Management – Topic: Online portals and accessibility

What is Enrollment Management (EM)?

Enrollment Management departments actively identify, counsel, recruit, and
enroll qualified students; and offer services that promote student retention
and success. Enrollment Management emerged as a new field in Student Affairs
in the 1980s.

Enrollment Management Organizational Example
At Oregon State University, EM consists of 6 units: Admissions, Student Orientation
and Retention Programs (SOAR), Registrar, Financial Aid and Scholarships,
SMILE, and Precollege Programs.

Strategic Enrollment Management concepts

  • Establishing clear goals for the number and types of students needed to
    fulfill the institutional mission.
  • Promoting academic success by improving student access, transition, persistence,
    and graduation.
  • Determining, achieving, and maintaining optimum enrollment.
  • Enabling the delivery of effective academic programs.
  • Generating added net revenue for the institution.
  • Enabling effective financial planning.
  • Increasing process and organizational efficiency.
  • Improving service levels to all stakeholders (e.g., prospective and current
    students, other institutional departments, other institutions, coordinating
    agencies).
  • Creating a data-rich environment to inform decisions and
    evaluate strategies. [We add analysis-rich too as many institutions
    are data-rich with the student information systems in place,
    yet a parallel investment has not often been made on analyzing
    the still “invisible” relationships].
  • Creating and continuously strengthening linkages with functions and activities
    across the campus.

(From “Strategic Enrollment Management: Core Strategies and Best Practices,” by
Bob Bontrager, 2004, College and University Journal, 79(4), 9 – 15.)


Enrollment Management and Online Portals
As new technologies emerge; Enrollment Management departments strive
to expand online services for their students. Through the use of online portals,
EM departments continue to strategically utilize technology to increase student
persistence and retention. Online portals are also useful in increasing student
satisfaction, institutional efficiency, and online service deliverables (Harr,
2002).

What is an online portal?
An online portal is defined as “an abridged and customized
version of the institutional Web presence… a "pocket-sized" version
of the campus Web. Portal technology adds "customization" and "community" to
the campus Web presence. Customization allows each user to define a unique
and personal view of the campus Web. Community tools, such as chat, forums,
survey, and so on, build relationships among campus constituencies” (
UPortal by JA-SIG)

Online Portals and Accessibility

The creators of most online portal applications state that they provide accessible
online solutions. SCT, the creators of the Luminis online portal state that
they are “committed to making the SCT Luminis product family increasingly
accessible for people with disabilities and more user-friendly for everyone.
Accessibility doctrine requires that all people, including those with disabilities,
have equal access to information technology through the implementation of a
universal design standard” (Sungard SCT, 2005). According to Blackboard,
another online portal vendor, “Blackboard is committed to the accessibility
of our e-Education platform. We are working with leaders in the accessibility
field to contemplate industry standards and federal guidelines for accessibility” (Accessibility).
In addition, WebCT, a worldwide leader in e-learning systems states that “WebCT’s
e-learning systems are World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) Priority 1 compliant
and adhere to Section 508 of the Americans with Disabilities Act” (WebCT
Accessibility).

Frequent accessibility issues with online portals

  • Frames – oftentimes, developers use frames as a convenient
    means to separate data sets. Frames are usually
    a virtual roadblock for users with visual impairments due to
    incompatibility with screen reader technology.
  • Alt tags – Alt tags are used to describe images. If an image is used
    to provide a user with content then the tag needs to correctly identify the
    image. If an image is used as a design element then the tag needs to be coded
    as alt=””. This will allow screen readers to pass over an image
    without wasting a user’s time.
  • CSS/XHTML – The use of structured markup is usually
    lacking on an online portal. Structured markup will ensure
    that when images and formatting are removed, the content
    of a site will still be accessible for all users.
  • Skip navigation links – If navigational menus are
    duplicated on all pages of a website than a developer should
    always provide the user with a means to skip the duplicated
    menu. This will create a heightened usability factor for your
    user.
  • New windows – When an online portal opens a new window, a user’s
    navigation ability can be severely decreased. The
    back button becomes useless and the ability to navigate to
    the previous page becomes impossible.
  • JavaScript – To achieve certain functionality, online portal developers
    have relied extensively on JavaScript. Unfortunately, this takes away the
    choice of browser options for most users. SCT’s
    Luminis becomes ineffective if JavaScript is turned
    off.

Note: SCT’s Luminis is currently in use by over 200
colleges and universities. Luminis contains frames, has improperly coded alt
tags, does not utilize CSS/XHTML markup, is missing skip navigation links,
opens new windows, and does not work if you turn off JavaScript. According
to SCT, “Future testing may include expanding client contact with schools
who are concerned about accessibility and feedback from users who face accessibility
challenges of all kinds” (Sungard SCT, 2005).

ADA and Section 508 Requirements

ADA : The interpretability
of the ADA can be both a benefit and a detriment to users with disabilities.
Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (Title II) requires
a public college to take appropriate steps to ensure that communications with
persons with disabilities "are as effective as communications with others" [28
C.F.R. § 35.160(a)]. OCR has repeatedly held that the terms "communication" in
this context means the transfer of information, including (but not limited
to) the verbal presentation of a lecturer, the printed text of a book, and
the resources of the Internet (California State University, Long Beach – Docket
Number 09-99-2041, 1999). Most colleges and universities attempt to comply
with the ADA but most fail to provide absolute accessibility with online services.
It can be posited that the lack of disability studies curriculum in computer
science, information systems, and education programs has led to a general lack
of support and understanding for online accessibility.

Section 508: Section 508 is part of the Rehabilitation Act
of 1973. It is intended to end discrimination against people who have disabilities
within the context of technological access. Section 508 officially became U.S.
law in 2001 (Zeldman, 2003).

Section 508 Internet component:
1194.22 Web-based intranet and internet information and applications.

(a) A text equivalent for every non-text element shall be
provided (e.g., via "alt", "longdesc", or in element content).

(b) Equivalent alternatives for any multimedia presentation
shall be synchronized with the presentation.

(c) Web pages shall be designed so that all information conveyed
with color is also available without color, for example from context or markup.

(d) Documents shall be organized so they are readable without
requiring an associated style sheet.

(e) Redundant text links shall be provided for each active
region of a server-side image map.

(f) Client-side image maps shall be provided instead of server-side
image maps except where the regions cannot be defined with an available geometric
shape.

(g) Row and column headers shall be identified for data tables.

(h) Markup shall be used to associate data cells and header
cells for data tables that have two or more logical levels of row or column
headers.

(i) Frames shall be titled with text that facilitates frame
identification and navigation.

(j) Pages shall be designed to avoid causing the screen to
flicker with a frequency greater than 2 Hz and lower than 55 Hz.

(k) A text-only page, with equivalent information or functionality,
shall be provided to make a web site comply with the provisions of this part,
when compliance cannot be accomplished in any other way. The content of the
text- only page shall be updated whenever the primary page changes.

(l) When pages utilize scripting languages to display content,
or to create interface elements, the information provided by the script shall
be identified with functional text that can be read by assistive technology.

(m) When a web page requires that an applet, plug-in or other
application be present on the client system to interpret page content, the
page must provide a link to a plug-in or applet that complies with §1194.21(a)
through (l).

(n) When electronic forms are designed to be completed on-line,
the form shall allow people using assistive technology to access the information,
field elements, and functionality required for completion and submission of
the form, including all directions and cues.

(o) A method shall be provided that permits users to skip
repetitive navigation links.

(p) When a timed response is required, the user shall be
alerted and given sufficient time to indicate more time is required.

(Web-based intranet and internet information and applications, 2002)

 

Software for website accessibility assessment

Software Tool

Evaluation Category

IBM – aDesigner

Accessibility and Vision tests

IBM – Home Page Reader v3.02

 

User Test(assistive technology)

Dolphin Access – Supernova Pro v5.1

 

User Test(assistive technology)

Lynx

User Test

(From Oregon State University Technology Access Program)

Why should online portals conform to web standards?

Coding using standards (particularly CSS for positioning, and strict HTML)
makes accessibility an easier goal to achieve , as standards have been created
with accessibility in mind. Being able to address accessibility issues means
being able to serve web content to a larger audience, increasing web site efficiency,
especially for users with disabilities.

Additional resources/readings

A List Apart: Source for web standards information
http://www.alistapart.com/topics/userscience/accessibility/

Assistive Technology Act of 1998
http://section508.gov/docs/AT1998.html

Information Technology Technical Assistance and Training Center (ITTATC):
National Assessment of State E&IT Accessibility Initiatives

http://www.ittatc.org/laws/state_intro.cfm

International Center for Disability Resources on the Internet

http://www.icdri.org/

Making Web Sites Work for People With Disabilities

http://chronicle.com/prm/weekly/v47/i21/21a03001.htm

National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR)

http://www.ed.gov/rschstat/research/pubs/programs.html

Opera: a web browser with several accessibility features

http://opera.com/features/access/

Oregon State University online accessibility documentation

http://www.oregonstate.edu/accessibility

Section 508 Information

http://www.section508.gov

Spazowham Design – “we build sites from raw, organic table-free
XHTML and CSS, 100% validated, compliant to W3C standards and Section 508,
and ready to run in any browser on any device.”

http://www.spazowham.com/

Texas Tech University Enrollment Management Plan 2002- 2006 http://www.ttu.edu/enrmgt/emplan/

WebAIM: Accessibility in Mind – Free online accessibility tools

http://www.webaim.org/techniques/articles/freetools/

WebAIM: Accessibility in Mind – Section 508 Web Accessibility Checklist

http://www.webaim.org/standards/508/508checklist.pdf

Web-Based Information and Prospective Students with Disabilities:
A Study of Liberal Arts Colleges

http://www.educause.edu/apps/eq/eqm04/eqm0446.asp

References

Blackboard Inc., (n.d.). Accessibility. Retrieved Apr. 22, 2005 , from Accessibility
FAQ’s Web site: http://www.blackboard.com/products/access/faqs.htm.

Bontrager, Bob . (2004). Strategic Enrollment Management: Core Strategies
and Best Practices. College and University Journal, 79(4), 9 – 15 .

California state university, long beach – docket number 09-99-2041. (1999).
Retrieved Apr. 24, 2005 , from http://www.icdri.org/legal/lbeach.htm.

Harr, G. L. (2002). Connections: a comprehensive student portal. concept
paper and proposal…

Sungard SCT. (2005). SCT luminis product family and accessibility [Brochure].
Malvern , PA

Uportal by ja-sig. (n.d.). Retrieved Apr. 23, 2005 , from http://www.uportal.org/index.html.

WebCT, (n.d.). WebCT accessibility. Retrieved Apr. 21, 2005 , from WebCT
Accessibility> Home Web site: http://www.webct.com/accessibility.

Web-based intranet and internet information and applications. (2002). Retrieved
Apr. 21, 2005 , from Section 508: Section 508 Standards Web site: http://www.section508.gov/index.cfm?FuseAction=Content&ID=12#Web.

Zeldman, J. (2003). Designing with web standards. Berkeley , CA
: New Riders.

Technology articles for student affairs practitioners

Using an Online Immersion to Teach and Learn about Student Affairs and Technology
http://studentaffairs.com/ejournal/summer_2005/UsingOnlineImmersion.html

Extreme Makeover: Technology’s Effect on Student Affairs
http://www.studentaffairs.com/ejournal/Winter_2005/ExtremeMakeover.html

The Net Generation Goes to College
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v52/i07/07a03401.htm