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A lens of -isms

5 comments



lens of isms

via Luke Sugie – Engineering Social Justice: Why not use a lens of -isms?

A typical tactic I’ve seen deployed against those who bring up issues of race, sex, class, ability, etc. is for the speaker to be accused of “always seeing racism everywhere” or “promoting the feminist/anti-racist/anti-classist agenda” and therefore unable to provide an “objective” critique of something.

This particular tactic has been used against posts on my blog more times than I can count.

Frankly, we should be able to move beyond this stage into the stage where we evaluate the claims people make — all people, feminist, anti-racist or not — by the evidence used to support them, rather than seeking to destroy credibility of the people that proclaim them.

Evaluating claims does not seem to be part of the process (although I deeply wish that it was) for folks who enjoy deploying the “you see it everywhere” trope.

Written by Eric Stoller

August 28th, 2008 at 8:28 pm

  • http://www.dancrall.blogspot.com crallspace

    So you know, I have evaluated the claims, and agree with you to some degree.

    In the post you link to, I am evaluating the effectiveness of your claims and questioning why this self-loathing anti-white, anti-male mantra overtakes your consciousness.

    But thanks for the link.

  • http://www.hypeelite.com Erika

    You know, I’ve seen it on here a few times too, and I’ve even heard it said to me a few times in my day to day life. Not to be rude, but I’ve come to accept it as something that comes out of the mouths of those privileged to not be judged by an aspect of their outer appearance…. if you don’t know what it’s like, don’t care what it’s like…. exactly how invested are you going to be in changing it?

    If you don’t know or acknowledge the problem, would the average person really commit to the effort involved in change?

  • http://ericstoller.com/blog/ Eric Stoller

    @crallspace –

    I’m not anti-white. I am white. I’m conscious of that fact. I am critically aware of what it means to be white in the U.S.

    I’m anti-racist.

    I’m not anti-male.
    I am male. I’m critically aware of my sex (but really what we’re talking about is my gender).

    I’m against sexism and the oppression of women.

  • http://www.gwinnettbuzz.com FinanceBuzz

    When you see racism in the most innocuous things, I feel the point is justified.

  • http://www.gwinnettbuzz.com FinanceBuzz

    Erika,

    “Not to be rude, but I’ve come to accept it as something that comes out of the mouths of those privileged to not be judged by an aspect of their outer appearance”

    To do this is just as dismissive as Eric claims that very position is. It allows you to effectively shoo aside legitimate question about your point of view or perspective which is key to how one frames their points.

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